Tag Archives: Barenaked Ladies

Kooky Christmas #11: “Deck the Stills” by Barenaked Ladies

Our wave of Kooky Christmas music is growing. My next selection is from a whole album of holiday oddity: Barenaked for the Holidays.

From the opening tune — a frenetic take on “Jingle Bells” — these songs all provide a new perspective on seasonal themes. You could choose almost any of these for the countdown.

#11: “Deck the Stills” by Barenaked Ladies

The strangest and most wonderful song on the album is “Deck the Stills”:

So wonderful, yet also so short. Let’s have another.

#11 supplement: “Elf’s Lament” by Barenaked Ladies

With all the excitement of Christmas and all the positive images of Santa, we rarely take a moment to consider the little people behind the big man. Yet these poor souls slave through the years, making presents for good girls and boys.
Sure, a few elves have been spotlighted through the years: Hermey in Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer, with his aspirations to be a dentist; Buddy from Elf; Legolas. But too often the elves toil unacknowledged.

In this song they make their protests heard.

“Elf’s Lament” (live) by Barenaked Ladies

Next on Kooky Christmas: more critique of Santa.

Holiday Music Countdown: Number 7, O Canada!

Only six shopping days ’til Christmas — but seven songs to enjoy. Here’s the next tune in my highly-subjective holiday music countdown. (Find previous holiday countdown posts here.)

7. God Rest Ye Merry Gentlemen (Barenaked Ladies & Sarah McLachlan)

There’s not a lot complicated about my affection for this version of "God Rest Ye Merry Gentlemen." It’s traditional yet unconventional; spunky and a little offbeat as Barenaked Ladies songs always are; and musically pretty as Sarah MacLaughlin songs are. It doesn’t sound particularly Canadian, but maybe my ears aren’t tuned to detect that frequency. I found this on a compilation (Maybe This Christmas), but it’s also available on Barenaked for the Holidays. I’d not heard of this album before tonight — the things one learns when writing blog posts! When I discover a new holiday album, I look to see if it includes songs that I don’t recognize — often a good sign. In this case, there are several Hanukkah songs and several original songs, all of which I’m unfamiliar with. Joy! I bought it and am currently listening. I’ll provide a full report soon, but early indications are that I’ve found some new favorites here. (The opening song, a manic version of "Jingle Bells," has already won my heart.)